David Mametplaces Wildean epigrams in the mouths of two Jamesian heroines and throws into the mix his own gift for electric power play, creating a vitriolic comedy of manners.

 
Two unmarried, financially independent, upper-class ladies (Pamela Rabeand Margaret Mills) are involved in a Boston marriage – a 19th century euphemism for a long-term, intimate relationship between two women, independent of any male. Directed by MTC’s Associate Director Aidan Fennessy, David Mamet’swickedly sharp drawing room comedy is intertwined with repressed desire and unrepentant greed.
 
In the drawing room of a fashionable Boston townhouse, Claire and Anna have struck perturbed waters in their long, intimate relationship. In need of money, Anna is considering a marriage of financial convenience; in need of satisfaction, Claire wants to consummate her crush on a young girl she’s recently met. Both, then, have causes for jealousy and both, regrettably, have tart tongues.
 
Anna (Pamela Rabe) and Claire (Margaret Mills), two bantering, scheming ‘women of fashion’ have long lived together on the fringes of upper-class New England society. Anna has recently become the mistress of a wealthy man, who supports her luxurious lifestyle.
 
Claire, meanwhile, has become infatuated with a respectable young lady and wants a jealous Anna to help her arrange a tryst. As the two women exchange blisteringly mannered barbs and take turns taunting Anna’s hapless Scottish parlour maid (Sara Gleeson), the object of Claire’s affection suddenly appears, setting off a crisis that puts both women’s futures at risk.
 
The ultimate parody of social proprieties and collapsed class distinctions, Boston Marriagedemonstrates how even sophisticated women of society will stop at nothing to get what they
want. David Mametplaces Wildean epigrams in the mouths of two Jamesian heroines and throws into the mix his own gift for electric power play, creating a vitriolic comedy of manners.
 
I have always loved how David Mamet’s great male-dominated plays fused surface linguistic brilliance with layers of game-playing subtext. In Boston Marriage you can see these skills transferred to an entirely unMamet-like milieu. A delicious tension arises when his strikingly modern sensibility crashes through the doors into the perfumed parlour of these respectable Bostonian bluestockings.’ MTC ArtisticDirector Simon Phillips.
 
David Mametis a playwright, author, poet and film writer/director. Some of Mamet’s plays include: The Old Neighbourhood, Oleanna, Glengarry Glen Ross, American Buffalo, A Life in the Theatre, Speed-the-Plow, Edmond, Lakeboat, The Water Engine, The Woods, Sexual Perversity in Chicago, Reunion and The Crytogram. Mamethas received many awards, including a 1984 Pulitzer Prize and NewYork Drama Critics Circle Award for his play Glengarry Glen Ross and the 1995 Obie Award for The Crytogram.
 
One of the funniest comedies in years.’ New York Post
 
 
Boston Marriage – the Arts Centre, Fairfax Studio
Season dates: 4 June to 24 July 2010
Opening night: Wednesday 9 June 2010 at 8:00pm
Tickets: $42.55 – $83.15 (Under 30s $30)
Booking information: MTC Box Office (03) 8688 0800
or mtc.com.au, the Arts Centre 1300 182 183 or
theartscentre.com.au
Mini Subscriptions now on sale: 3-6 play packages start from
as little as $130.80, Under 30s just $75.00 MTC Box Office
(03) 8688 0800 or mtc.com.au

 

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