Arts Centre Melbourne is bringing Declan Furber Gillick’s powerful show Bighouse Dreaming to the Fairfax Studio from 5 – 9 May as a part of YIRRAMBOI Festival.

The award-winning work returns to Melbourne for the first time since Fringe Festival 2018 and will create an important space as it explores themes of Australia’s judicial system and the challenges that face Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

Bighouse Dreaming follows Chris “C-War” Wallace, a 15 year old from a troubled regional town, who is balancing school, court family dramas and stints in The Bighouse to try and make it as a rapper.

Combining the rhythm and cultural force of hip hop with theatre, this is a provocative and urgent performance that holds an unflinching lens to the justice system, youth prisons and Australian masculinity – black and white.

Bighouse Dreaming holds a mirror to some glaring issues present in Australia’s systems of law and justice and the themes explored in this performance are important to engage with, not only for justice but for progress.

Bighouse Dreaming holds a mirror to some glaring issues present in Australia’s systems of law and justice and the themes explored in this performance are important to engage with, not only for justice but for progress.

Writer-performer Declan Furber Gillick is an Arrernte artist with a background in performance poetry and narrative story-telling. He worked as an Aboriginal Legal Support Assistant, inter-cultural Educator and Court Staffer before completing a Masters of Writing for Performance at Victorian College of the Arts 2017. In 2018 his first play The Great Emu War received a staged reading at Melbourne Theatre Company, where he is currently a writer in residence. Bighouse Dreaming was developed with the support of Deadly Fringe, a collaborative initiative between ILBIJERRI and Melbourne Fringe.

Warnings: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and People of Colour are cautioned that this performance contains strong themes relating to state violence against Indigenous people. Bighouse Dreaming contains frequent coarse language and adult themes.

Comments

comments